This Week in Houston Real Estate: A gentrifying city, Texas growth and more

by Scott Klocksin

A new study conducted by Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research shows that many of neighborhoods that lie inside the 610 Loop have the potential to become gentrified.

The report breaks tracts of the city down by three categories. First, “established,” which it defines as having gentrified in the past but no longer showing signs of the phenomenon. Second, “gentrifying,” which it applies to areas that experienced signs of gentrification between 2000 and 2010, between 2010 and 2016, or during both of those time periods. And third, “continual,” which the study’s authors apply to areas that have shown signs of gentrification steadily since the 1990s.

A color-coded map in the report shows that nearly all of the areas in the eastern half of the space inside the Loop are considered “gentrifying,” while many neighborhoods in the northwest portion of the territory inside the Loop, from Montrose to parts of the Heights, are either “established” or “continual.”  

In other real estate news:

  • A New report by the U.S. Census Bureau shows that Texas ranks high in two separate categories of population growth. The Lone Star State ranks No. 1 in the country in strictly numeric growth, adding 379,128 new residents since 2010, when the last official census was taken. Texas also ranks eighth in the country for percentage population growth since 2010, with 1.3 percent more residents.
  • Hines has backed out of a plan to build a business park in Katy. The Chronicle reports that the Houston-based developer has opted instead to sell the 150-acre plot where Igloo Road crosses I-10 to wholesale retailer Costco.
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